Preeclampsia and Other Hypertensive Disorders

Health and Wellness Postpartum Pregnancy

Let's keep the pressure down!

During Preeclampsia Awareness Month in May, WIC staff can help spread awareness about this potentially life-threatening condition, as well as other hypertensive disorders. Preeclampsia is a disorder that occurs only during pregnancy and the postpartum period, affecting both the mother and the unborn baby.  If the condition results in lower blood supply to the fetus, there may be less oxygen and fewer nutrients available for optimal fetal development. Eclampsia and HELLP Syndrome are two other pregnancy related blood pressure conditions. 

Mothers with pregnancy-related high blood pressure can experience symptoms such as severe headaches, nausea or vomiting or have no symptoms at all.  Share resources with your WIC families that can help them understand the importance of early and regular prenatal care and talking with their health care provider about symptoms of preeclampsia and high blood pressure during pregnancy

 
 

Preeclampsia and other hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are a leading cause of maternal and infant morbidity.

 

CDC resources for WIC staff to learn and help educate participants on this topic include information about:

 

Nutrition and Physical Activity Related Resources

While managing preeclampsia is outside WIC's scope, managing high blood pressure that existed before pregnancy includes lifestyle changes that are consistent with general recommendations for a healthy pregnancy - eating a healthy diet, exercising, not smoking, and managing stress.

In addition to recipes, tip sheets (offering active play suggestions, as well as, daily food check lists for pregnant and breastfeeding moms) and other nutrition education publications you can download, MyPlate offers something for everyone, including:

 Want more activity resources? Check out those from the Move Your Way Campaign.

pregnant woman and health care worker during blood pressure screening
Developed by: HHS, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
USDA, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion